Saturday, April 4, 2015

Iran | Shiraz | Nasir al-Mulk Mosque

While I Was In Iran I wandered down to the city of Shiraz to visit the Nasir al-Mulk Mosque. Mirza Hasan Ali Nasir al-Mulk, a panjandrum in the Qajar Dynasty (1785–1925), commissioned the mosque in 1876 and it  was finally finished in 1888. The mosque is known locally as the Pink Mosque because of the pink color incorporated in many of the tiles decorating its exterior and interior. According to local sources tile makers developed a method of using the color pink in tiles only in the mid-nineteenth century. They used the color with exuberance here. The mosque is also famous for its stained glass windows. While I was there a professional Chinese photographer was taking photos of luxuriously dressed Chinese models lolling in the pools of colored light cast by the stained glass. The models were wearing full-length dresses and headscarves. Some had donned beaded veils covering their faces below their eyes. The poses they had assumed were rather suggestive, however, and I could not help but wonder how they got away with this in a mosque. I waited until they left to take my own photos
 Entranceway to the  Nasir al-Mulk Mosque (click on photos for enlargements)
 Courtyard of the  Nasir al-Mulk Mosque
 One end of the courtyard
 Interior of the mosque
  Interior of the mosque
 Inset in the interior of the mosque
 Interior decoration 
Detail of interior decoration

5 comments:

  1. This mosque is one of the most beautiful ever created...let's hope it isn't destroyed. Thank you for including it in your blog.

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  2. Don, which came first, the exquisite carpets or the splendid artwork in the mosques and other architecture?

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  3. I would have to guess the mosque came first.

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  4. I read somewhere recently that the carpets were "donations" from the tribes or people that made them. Do you know anything about that? Donations for favors? Weddings? Funerals? Purgatory? The mind reels.

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  5. I did not hear anything about the carpets. Actually there was no caretaker or anyone else there to explain anything.

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