Sunday, July 24, 2011

Silk Road | Cook Books and Recipes

Just beefed up the Silk Road Section of my Scriptorium with two new cooking titles: the first is Silk Road Cooking: A Vegetarian Journey.
I am an omnivore but I do like vegetarian food and this coffee table-type book has some great recipes to say nothing of nice photos and interesting essays on various aspects of the Silk Road. 


I have read through both books and will have updates on the various recipes soon. In the meantime here is a Good Kebab Recipe from Sasha Martin at Global Table Adventure.
Mouth-wateringly delectable Kebabs 
Sasha Martin
Although I have had it in the Scriptorium for quite a while, perhaps now is the proper time to mention A Baghdad Cookery Book

This book is not only of culinary but also of historical interest, since it dates to the thirteenth century, presumably before the arrival of Khülügu Khan in Baghdad in 1258. Arabist A. J. Arberry first translated the text in 1939; the current translation is by culinary historian Charles Perry. Provides some interesting insights into what was tickling the palates of Mesopotamians during the Caliphate. For more on this you might also want to see Annals of the Caliphs' Kitchens.

15 comments:

  1. Very nice! Is Iraq next?

    -a mes

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  2. I have updated the post for the benefit of Mesopotamians.

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  3. By the way, the Silk Road Gourmet is sponsoring something called The Ancient Mesopotamian Cookoff Challenge. Sounds like a Take-No-Prisoners Culinary Shoot-out.

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  4. Ooooooh! Thank you so much, Don! I suppose pistachio ice cream would be out of the question, but maybe I can think of something....

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  5. Hi Don!

    A Tethys Sea expert indeed!

    Sasha's kebab is the only one that she didn't adapt from my book for that week. But I urge your readers to check out her blog - she is wonderful!

    Also, I am holding a Mesopotamian Cookoff based on selected recipes from the Yale Babylonian tablets throughout the months of August and Septmeber. I hope you can join us and cook up a storm!

    Laura

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  6. Thanks Don for the link to Laura's website, it's a treat! Being a tea aficionado yourself , have your read her post about Burma and the origin of tea?
    It's a delight to find someone as enthusiastic as myself about Nepalese cuisine too ;)

    Jean-Emmanuel

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  7. I saw the post on tea—very interesting. And I just got a shipment of fresh green tea from Yunnan! A big week for tea!

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  8. what's that on the photo next to Kebab? soy sauce?

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  9. I think it is pomegranate syrup. I have never been to Iran, but based on Iranian recipes I have seen from I don’t think soy sauce is a common ingredient there. I have seldom seen it used in Turkestan either.

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  10. Off topic, but do you have any suggestions for beautiful literature that relates to nature? I'm asking around.

    -a mes

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  11. Hmmm…“beautiful literature that relates to nature”. I must admit that draws a mental blank . . . I am more into history than nature . . . I have not gone to several of the most famous natural wonders of Mongolia—Gurvan Saikhan (Three Beauties) Mountains in the Gobi Desert, for example, because they have no historical connections that I can discover. If I think of something I will leave a comment here. By the way, both of the blogs mentioned in this post have Mesopotamian themes in their latest posts. It seems Mesopotamianism is in the air!

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  12. Thanks, Don. I have the same problem as you. A friend of mine recently asked me if I knew of any such books - I think she's somewhat in a "funk" right now. Like you, I could only think of historical books. Sad, huh? So, I'm asking around. I need to learn to appreciate beautiful literature, again. Definitely let me know if you think of anything.

    Yeah, saw the websites. Thanks!

    -a mes

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  13. Wait! Someone sent me an email recommending The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World.

    If you mean “beautiful literature” and not literature about the beauty of nature I can recommend Pascali's Island. I am not sure this will cheer your friend up though.

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  14. Thank you so much! Michael Pollan AND a novel set during the waning years of the Ottoman Empire! Who couldn't ask for more!!!

    -a mes

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